Sulphur and Roses

The Clean Air Act of 1968 had a very positive effect on the nation’s health but ironically, the removal from the atmosphere of harmful sulphur fumes had an unexpected and devastating effect on the nation’s favourite flower.

Black Spot has become Public Enemy No 1

Nick Baldwin from Greenacres Direct believes he has the solution and is looking for Rose Society members to try his product out

 

Sulphur a Great Ally of the Rose      

Sulphur has throughout the ages been a huge benefit to both the horticultural and agricultural sector.

Sulphur provides many vital components that are essential to plants for both growth and vibrancy. One of the key attributes with sulphur is the ability to alter the pH of the soil making it more acidic and thus providing the optimum growing medium and lessen the risk of the plant becoming chlorotic resulting in weakness and diseased.

A key component of sulphur is its ability to release locked up nutrients in the soil together with helping in the formation of important enzymes and assisting in the formation of protein within the plant. Sulphur is also invaluable in the formation of chlorophyll.

The favourite diet of roses is a well-fed, heavy,acidic soil of pH 5.5 to 6.5.If your soil is greater than PH7 (alkaline) an application of sulphur twice a year will reduce the pH of the soil (always check soil pH prior to application).

Produced in a clean 1-2mm chip our Sulphur Soil granules are fast acting lasts for up to 2 years and if kept dry will not expire.

Blackspot and Powdery Mildew

Sulphur is the natural enemy of blackspot and powdery mildew diseases. In times when sulphur dioxide was present in the atmosphere, as a result of coal burning fires and industrial pollution, prior to the 1968 Clean air act blackspot was unknown.

In recent years concern has grown amongst scientists and environmentalists that neonicotinoid chemicals harm bees.

A recent detailed report published into effects of neonicotinoids has produced strong evidence relating to neonicotinoids and their impact on the bee and the environment.

The RHS has been a strong advocate of this and has been extremely proactive in removing any products containing neonicotinoids from their retail operation.

Sulphur Rose is a perfect tonic for healthy blooms and foliage whilst providing a barrier to stop spores and disease penetrating the leaf, application should be throughout the year as the blackspot spores overwinter in the soil and in nooks and crannies on the rose stems. As temperatures rise in the spring, the spores become active and air borne on the wind or splashed onto the plant by rain hitting the soil. The disease starts again and the new leaves are attacked.

Sulphur Rose has no chemical content and is safe to humans, wildlife, pets and especially Bees.

 

Greenacres Direct are looking for 10 rose society members who would like to trial our products and report back with their findings – we will supply product free of charge.

Please contact :-

Nick Baldwin

Greenacres Direct

[email protected]

01858 410725

 

 

 

 

 

  Sulphur chips

 

Mike Thompson Trials “Sulphur Rose”   

 

Up until this year, I had never heard of Greenacres direct  Sulphur Rose and Sulphur soil but getting a sample to try I thought lets give it a go. I have always known that sulphur is a friend of the rose living in an area of high sulphur, South Wales. With all those Coal Mines now gone it’s not a coincidence that blackspot and mildew has returned with a vengeance. I have never quite known how to use it, always being afraid I might burn the roses. So after the Malvern Spring show I turfed a batch of roses out of the Polytunnel into the open air. Being a bit cautious I tried the spray first on a few bushes just to see if it would burn. It didn’t burn so I quickly used the rest of the bottle of spray on the rest of the roses. I then turned to the box of sulphur rose, using a 5 gall sprayer and continued to spray throughout the summer, and I have to say that batch of roses have remained clean up to writing this article at the end of August. It has given me the confidence to spray the rose stems this  Winter and next Spring before pruning. I do believe that Blackspot and Downy Mildew over winter in the stem leaf  joints and spraying winter time will kill their spores off. The other big attraction for me is that Sulphur Rose is Bumblebee friendly and is not a pesticide and will certainly help us when new laws are brought in. Sulphur Soil I will put on the garden when the potatoes are out. It’s a Yes from me.

Michael Thompson

Rose Society of Wales.